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Workshops: August 2018

Let's Talk About Teaching

LTAT - Let's Talk About Teaching

Supporting student success through conversations, workshops and networking for all faculty, instructors and lecturers at UVic. The event will include concurrent workshops led by award-winning UVic teachers and LTSI staff.

The program will be available soon. It is easiest to see the workshops in the View by Group option above. Scroll down to LTAT - Let's Talk about Teaching.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (8:00 AM - 8:30 AM)

CHECK-IN: Let's Talk About Teaching
2018 2018K CHECKIN

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: foyer)

Facilitator(s): TBA

Description: Please come early to register, pick up conference material and to enjoy some coffee and pastries. No need to register for this portion.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (8:30 AM - 9:15 AM)

WELCOME and KEYNOTE - Let's Talk About Teaching
2018 2018K OPENING

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: HHB 105)

Facilitator(s): Brian Leacock (Business), Laurene Sheilds (Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation)

Description: 1. Acknowledgement of the Territory and welcome by Dr. Laurene Sheilds, Executive Director, of the Division of Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation. 2. Opening Keynote by Dr. Brian Leacock, 2017 Harry Hickman Alumni Award winner for Excellence in Teaching and Educational Leadership

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (9:30 AM - 11:00 AM)

A1 - Bringing the kitchen table to academia: Decolonizing conversations in the classroom
2018 2018K A1

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: HHB 110)

Facilitator(s): Artemis Fire (Camosun College), Jin Sun Yoon (School of Child and Youth Care)

Description: In this session, we open a forum to share with each other using a methodology familiar to some, but rarely in the academy. We bring in the “kitchen table” as both a metaphor and an honouring of marginalized and equity-seeking people who have historically met at kitchen tables to resist, mobilize, and activate their agency. The audience become “invited guests” to the table as they wish to participate. We will start a conversation beginning with our individual social locations and our thoughts on indigenizing, decolonizing, and reconciliation. There will be an outer circle to witness the conversation, but there will be empty chairs at the table to join in. This approach allows the freedom for people to share their knowledge and to learn from each other that disrupts colonial concepts of exceptionalism and expertise.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (9:30 AM - 11:00 AM)

A2: First year instructors working group panel discussion
2018 2018K A2

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 116)

Facilitator(s): Lara Lauzon (School of Physical Education), Erin McGuire (Anthropology), Allyson Hadwin (Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies), Erin Kelly (English), Iris Gordon, Jane Butterfield (Mathematics & Statistics), Roswitha Marx (Biology)

Description: This interactive panel session is designed for anyone who has taught or is planning to teach a first-year undergraduate course. Panelists will share perspectives gained in our work teaching first year students. The session will unfold in 2 parts. Part 1: Panelists will share perspectives on four guiding questions: • What is exciting and rewarding about teaching first year students? • What is surprising/challenging about teaching first year students? • What do my students need to know or do in order to be successful? • Supporting 1st year students: • What is my most successful innovation for supporting success with first year students? • What was my least successful innovation for supporting success with first year students? Part 2: Will engage participants in small group discussions to share instructional strategies for supporting success in first year courses.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (9:30 AM - 11:00 AM)

A3: BC curriculum transformation: Impacts on campus teaching and learning
2018 2018K A3

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 120)

Facilitator(s): Kathy Sanford (Curriculum and Instruction), Dana Bell, Kerry Robertson

Description: This presentation will discuss the changes to pedagogical approaches in K-12 as a result of the new BC Curriculum, including assessment practices and expectations, and ways post-secondary educators can consider how to best consider and address these changes in campus courses. This session will focus on secondary curriculum as it is most closely connected to post-secondary, but will include a discussion of the theoretical frameworks underpinning BC changes as well as those that have influenced education systems internationally. Participants of this session will have a deeper understanding of BC curriculum changes, implications of curriculum change on post-secondary education, pedagogical models of engaging students (experiential, interactive, engagement, problem-based, etc) and ways in which assessment is impacted by changing pedagogical approaches.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (9:30 AM - 11:00 AM)

A4: Backward course design: Beginning with learning outcomes
2018 2018K A4

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 128)

Facilitator(s): Joe Parsons (Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation), Marty Wall (Division of Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation)

Description: In this session, you will engage in a process that focuses on student learning rather than on the subject matter as the starting point to designing or redesigning a course. By beginning with the intended learning outcomes, the design of the course becomes more transparent and explicit for both the instructor and the students. Through discussion, you will become familiar with Wiggins and McTighe’s (1998) book, Understanding by Design, and through exercises you will practice applying this process to a new or existing course.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (11:15 AM - 12:15 PM)

B1: The magic of rubrics: Design, implementation and calibration
2018 2018K B1

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 110)

Facilitator(s): Catherine Harding (History in Art/Medieval Studies), Suzan Last (English), Monika Smith (English), Victoria Wyatt (Art History & Visual Studies)

Description: In this 60-minute panel discussion, we will offer four short presentations on the magic of rubrics for the student-teacher experience. We will demonstrate how we use rubrics to provide clarity, both for ourselves and our students, in terms of designing assignments, staging learning throughout the course, and offering clear expectations of learning goals in specific situations. As advance organizers of content and processual goals, rubrics can be a key tool in creating dynamic learning in classrooms in any discipline. We will also tackle one of the more demanding aspects of designing rubrics: namely, the need for precise calibration to avoid grade inflation, as well as keeping the design of assignments robust and dynamic, to offer effective feedback and support to students. As we will suggest, rubrics can also be essentials tools in the design of curriculum goals for unit programmes.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (11:15 AM - 12:15 PM)

B2: Supporting student success with learning data from CourseSpaces
2018 2018K B2

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 116)

Facilitator(s): Sarah Davis, Shayla Starcheski (Technology Integrated Learning (LTSI)), Becca Edwards (Technology Integrated Learning (LTSI))

Description: Big data is a big deal in our technology-driven society. Learning analytics focuses on data collected during the process of learning in order to inform students, instructors, and support staff of academic progress (Siemens & Long, 2011; Siemens & Baker, 2012). Learning analytics are being increasingly used to support student success and learning in post-secondary institutions worldwide, but this process is not without ethical and privacy concerns, or best practices for implementation. This presentation will provide a brief introduction to learning analytics, describe findings from our recent pilot project, and discuss ways to find and use data from CourseSpaces. By the end of the session, attendees will be able to (a) identify a range of uses for learning analytics in higher education and (b) select one strategy for using learning data to support student success in their own course.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (11:15 AM - 12:15 PM)

B3: Social dance: The ideal 'meet and greet' for breaking the ice and developing connection within new or familiar groups of people
2018 2018K B3

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 120)

Facilitator(s): Merrie Klazek

Description: So much of effective contribution in the workplace and in the world has to do with how we interact with others. Building community, building relationships, building productivity - are all interwoven into connection with one another, whether talking about a group of primary school children, reluctant teens, adults, seniors or an inter-generational mix. With years of experience as a professional musician and dance caller, Professor Merrie Klazek explains why social dance (squares, contras, community folk dance) is one of the most efficient ways of creating connection, regardless of demographic. Whether used for new introductions or to strengthen the connection between individuals already familiar with each other, social dance is effective for so many reasons, including eye contact, respectful physical connection, confidence building and, most importantly, the collective generation of joy - the magnitude of which is usually a surprise to participants. In this interactive session, we will explore these concepts and learn several dances that can be easily taught. Live music may accompany!

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (11:15 AM - 12:15 PM)

B4: Fostering students' motivation through self-determination and a strengths-based approach
2018 2018K B4

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 128)

Facilitator(s): Patricia Minor, Elizabeth Webster (Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies)

Description: In this discussion-based and participatory session, we will explore self-determination and a strengths-based approach in supporting students’ motivation and success. We will briefly highlight the benefits of these approaches according to the academic literature. UVic’s Learning Assistance Program employs graduate students as tutors and learning strategists who deliver one-on-one support to students. Tutors and strategists are trained to support student self-determination, and to celebrate students’ diverse strengths. We will examine how a tutor might apply these approaches while tutoring in their discipline. By the end of the session, you will be able to: consider students’ diverse motivations and definitions of success; recognize the concept of self-determination in higher education and how it can help foster students’ autonomy and motivation; explore strategies to apply a strengths-based approach when working with students; and brainstorm instructional strategies which could be implemented in a variety of teaching contexts.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (12:15 PM - 1:30 PM)

Informal Lunch Discussion with President Jamie Cassels and Dr. Valerie Kuehne
2018 2018K LUNCH

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 105)

Facilitator(s): Valerie S. Kuehne (Vice-President, External Relations), Jamie Cassels

Description: Join President Cassels and VP Kuehne in HHB 105 for an informal lunch and talk. Lunch provided.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (1:40 PM - 3:10 PM)

C1: Lessons to action! Community and campus creating meaningful experiential learning opportunities
2018 2018K C1

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 110)

Facilitator(s): Rhianna Nagel (Geography), Lisa Mort-Putland, Tracey Gibson, Chelsea Falconer, Lilaine Galway, Kathy Sanford (Curriculum and Instruction)

Description: Many campus instructors are interested in integrating community-based components into their courses and programs, but often do not have the requisite partnership connections or understanding of community needs in relation to these partnerships. This presentation will discuss ways to begin developing ongoing, robust partnerships between community organizations and campus programs in order to: 1) support their students’ learning; 2) enhance the experience for community; and 3) enrich the campus-based aspects of the course/program. Through this presentation, instructors will benefit from the expertise of the community workers, gain a deeper understanding of diverse roles and community needs, and build respectful and meaningful relationships that enable students to be knowledge mobilizers in the context of community engaged and service learning. As many programs rely on community placements as an aspect of their programming, the better the understanding and relationships between these partners, the more effective the preparation of future professionals.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (1:40 PM - 3:10 PM)

C2: Utilizing the circle as pedagogy: Developing respectful conversations
2018 2018K C2

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 116)

Facilitator(s): Maureen Ryan (Senior Instructor), Leanne Kelly

Description: Gathering in a circle to discuss and listen is a universal technique found in many cultures and communities. In this session, discussion about the teachings of the circle from our Indigenous lens as a Cree-Metis woman and woman who shares a Mi’kmaq and Celtic ancestry will be presented as a teaching and learning methodology. Attendees will learn about the use of circle as a pedagogy for high-level engagement in critical thinking, cooperative discourse and in-class assignment work. Participants are asked to come to this session having read a short article (will be provided) and be prepared to engage with group members in completing their ‘assignment’. A larger circle will round out the session where participants will share their experiences and engage with us. Participants will leave this session having experienced an approach to encouraging respectful conversations in the classroom involving multiple points of view on provocative topics. We believe our approach to circle work moves beyond the power point and provides experiential learning through Indigenous ontology.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (1:40 PM - 3:40 PM)

C3: EdcampUVic: Join the conversation!
2018 2018K C3

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 128)

Facilitator(s): Val Irvine (Curriculum & Instruction)

Description: You may have heard of an unconference or may have participated in one before. The #EdCamp unconference phenomenon first emerged and became popularized in the K12 sector in Philadelphia and recently was featured in the New York Times. Here at UVic, we hosted #EdcampWest twice, which was the first higher education-themed #Edcamp, co-located with SFU, and it also embedded the first online #Edcamp. It is also a wonderful strategy to use in your higher education classroom or as a means to connect further among your academic and stakeholder community. In this session, we will introduce what an Edcamp is, then after posting and voting up topics for conversation, we will host a single Edcamp session with concurrent conversations across different rooms (HHB128, 120 and 105; MACD111 and 115). After the experience, we will return to our main room to discuss the experience and how it might fit into our classroom and community-engagement experiences online and offline.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (1:40 PM - 3:40 PM)

C4: Encouraging diverse perspectives in the classroom: Creating a respectful, discussion-based environment through looking at art
2018 2018K C4

Location: Mearns Centre/McPherson Library (Room: A025)

Facilitator(s): Victoria Wyatt (Art History & Visual Studies), Gillian Booth (Legacy Art Galleries)

Description: This learner-centred workshop is designed for instructors from any discipline who are looking to encourage discussion and respect for multiple perspectives in their classroom. We will show how looking at and responding to art can help build an inclusive learning environment that encourages respectful interactions and multiple points of view. Featuring art works from the Legacy Gallery collection, participants will be introduced to Visual Thinking Strategies, a teaching technique that uses the practice of extended observation of visual imagery followed by discussion to help students experience a willingness and ability to present their own ideas. Visual Thinking Strategies will help students learn how to: - Look deeply - Inquire openly - Listen attentively - Suspend judgement - Hold multiple perspectives – listen to and consider the views of others - Think critically and question assumptions Participants will take home teaching techniques that foster creativity, student motivation and active participation.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 (3:45 PM - 5:00 PM)

Reception with Jim Dunsdon, Associate VP Student Affairs
2018 2018K RECEPTION

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 105)

Facilitator(s): Jim Dunsdon

Description: Refreshments provided.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (8:30 AM - 9:00 AM)

CHECK-IN: Let's Talk About Teaching
2018 2018K CHECKING

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: foyer)

Facilitator(s): TBA

Description: For those who didn't register and check-in yesterday, please come a bit early to register and enjoy a cup of coffee and some pastries. No need to register for this session.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (9:00 AM - 9:50 AM)

OPENING PLENARY: Experiential learning through research-enriched experiences
2018 2018K PLENARY

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 105)

Facilitator(s): Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier (Anthropology), Maxwell Nicholson, Cara Samuel, Michael Graeme, Stephanie Willerth (Mechanical Engineering)

Description: Stephanie Willerth and Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier are 2017 UVic award winners for teaching excellence. Cara Samuel, Mike Graeme and Maxwell Nicholson are 2017 3M National Student Fellows.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (10:00 AM - 10:55 AM)

Technology Showcase and Poster Session
2018 2018K POSTERS

Location: MacLaurin Building (Room: D115)

Facilitator(s): TBA

Description: There will be 6 TECH STATION presentations and 5 POSTER presentations. Please refer to the program for full descriptions. Coffee and dessert provided.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM)

D1: Making meaningful learning happen: Critical thinking as a pedagogic framework
2018 2018K D1

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 110)

Facilitator(s): Geraldine Van Gyn (Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education)

Description: Critical thinking (CT) is considered the most important mode of thinking and a significant outcome of a university education. In this session, we will consider CT, not as an outcome, but as a pedagogical framework to engage students in meaningful learning. In reflecting on specific influences on students’ perspectives on learning and through linking CT to several influential learning theories, this interactive session will encourage you to use the various aspects of CT to design meaningful learning experiences.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM)

D2: Joining the circle: Creating Indigenous-informed curricula for students across health disciplines
2018 2018K D2

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 116)

Facilitator(s): Dawn-Lee Ricard, Anne Marshall (Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies and Centre for Youth and Society), Natasha Caverley, Allison Reeves

Description: Drawing upon the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) calls to action on Indigenous health, wellness, and healing (specifically, TRC Recommendations #21 – #24) and inclusive education (#10), there is an emerging need for advancing health and social service support in Indigenous communities throughout Canada. This presentation details a proactive curriculum change undertaken in the Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, which involves the re-design of several undergraduate counselling courses to become universally Indigenous-informed. Funded through the Division of Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation, this project facilitates student learning on topics related to colonization and historical trauma, the healing potential of Indigenous cultural resurgence initiatives, and Indigenous helping practices for students.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM)

D3: Approaches to decolonization in the Anthropology and English classroom
2018 2018K D3

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 120)

Facilitator(s): Erin McGuire (Anthropology), Sara Humphreys (English)

Description: Our presentation will facilitate discussion around approaches to decolonization in the classroom. Erin McGuire (Anthropology) and Sara Humphreys (English) each work in disciplines that have perpetuated colonial violence. While it’s highly debatable if the disciplines themselves can be decolonized, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has made it clear that those in educational fields need to address colonialism and its ongoing impacts explicitly. Both Erin and Sara will discuss how they have made these attempts in their respective classes, engaging the audience to consider their own efforts. We hope to follow with a productive discussion about how to make decolonization a pedagogical reality, recognising that it is an ongoing process, requiring reflection, research and an openness to diverse perspectives. Please read the program for a full description.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (11:00 AM - 12:30 PM)

D4: Planning for enhanced student engagement in classrooms
2018 2018K D4

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 128)

Facilitator(s): Ilamparithi Thirumarai Chelvan (Electrical & Computer Engineering)

Description: The objective of this sixty-minute concurrent session is to design a lesson plan that embeds student engagement as a vital component. At the end of the session, by working in groups of 2 or 3 and by using a template provided, the participants will be able to design a lesson plan for a given topic that facilitates enhanced student engagement in classrooms of any size. In the first 10 minutes of the session, the participants will be engaged in a Think-Pair-Share activity focusing on: 1. What does student engagement mean to the participant? 2. What practices/activities the participant has adopted to encourage student engagement? 3. Is any of the aforementioned practice/activity planned ahead of time? Following the Think-Pair-Share activity, a template of a lesson plan that entrenches student engagement as a significant portion of the lesson will be shared. The participants will then work in groups of 2 or 3 to create a lesson plan using the discussed template on a selected topic for varying class sizes.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (12:40 PM - 1:30 PM)

PANEL and LUNCH: Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment for All Students: Universal Instructional Design
2018 2018K PANEL

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 105)

Facilitator(s): Telka Duxbury (English), Hanny Buitenwerfn (Human Geography and Art), Victoria Wyatt (Art History & Visual Studies), Laurene Sheilds (Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation)

Description: The incorporation of universal instructional design (UID) is important in creating successful learning environments for all students. It is also a key strategy for faculty in effectively designing accessible and vibrant courses, reducing the need for course modifications to address accommodation requirements. This session will feature a panel discussing the role of UID from the perspective of a faculty member, a student and an advisor from the Centre for Accessible Learning. Barriers, opportunities and challenges will be discussed as well as practical tips/resources.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (1:35 PM - 2:35 PM)

E1: Quick tips and strategies for designing dynamic learning opportunities using CourseSpaces
2018 2018K E1

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 110)

Facilitator(s): Becca Edwards (Technology Integrated Learning (LTSI)), Shayla Starcheski (Technology Integrated Learning (LTSI)), Hayley Hewson (Technology Integrated Learning (LTSI))

Description: As an educator, you want to create a dynamic learning experience for your students both in the classroom and beyond. Many educators look to educational technology to help achieve this goal. CourseSpaces is the most commonly used educational technology at UVic. In this session we ask the question: How can CourseSpaces help you enhance the learning and teaching environment? During this session, we will present a series of example courses and discuss the challenges and opportunities in each course. You will learn how some small changes to how you use CourseSpaces can increase efficiency, allow flexibility, provide avenues for interaction, and enhance student motivation. More information is available on the program.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (1:35 PM - 2:35 PM)

E2: Explorable explanations
2018 2018K E2

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 116)

Facilitator(s): Adam Krawitz (Psychology)

Description: The web has the potential to be so much more than a distribution mechanism for static texts and recorded videos – let’s explore the possibilities. Explorable explanations are efforts to “enable and encourage truly active reading” by using the modern webpage to create documents that act as “environments to think in” instead of “information to be consumed” (Victor, 2011). I will introduce the concept with an eye to: historical precedents such as hypertext and Gedankenexperiments; the advantages of the web as an interactive computational medium perfect for simulation, modeling, and experimentation; and specific examples participants can try for themselves. From there, we can discuss potential costs and benefits of this approach, and the practical challenges that implementation can present.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (1:35 PM - 2:35 PM)

E3 Preparation and performance Tips and tools for keeping panic at bay and welcoming creativity and joy into performance situations including teaching
2018 2018K E3

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 128)

Facilitator(s): Merrie Klazek

Description: At some point, we all find ourselves in a performance situation – public speaking, performing arts, competition athletics, teaching… With all of these situations, we are driven by a desire to effectively impart that which we are passionate about, so that our passion becomes a shared experience with our audience. In optimal performance flow, the separation of teacher and student, musician and listener, athlete and spectator, becomes fluid; the experience hovers at a level that transcends separation, and the experience resonates back and forth between the giver and the receiver. This level of flow is the magical ideal, and although it is impractical to expect it all of the time, we can achieve it more easily by understanding the process by which it develops. The opposite state can take the form of boredom (lack of inspiration) or more often, panic. In this presentation, we will learn to understand our individual responses (mental and physical) to performance stress, in order to build confidence and ultimately enter the flow zone. We will explore the three areas of preparation: understanding function, developing consistency, and mental practice. Although the first two areas are fairly trade specific, there are some common approaches to strengthen these aspects of preparation. The third area, mental practice, is universally applicable. Concrete tools such as centering, visualization, affirmation, activation notes and body awareness will be discussed and put into active practice.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (1:35 PM - 3:35 PM)

E4: From lesson plans to learning plans: Shifting the dynamics to support student-centred learning
2018 2018K E4

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 120)

Facilitator(s): Val Irvine (Curriculum & Instruction), Jeff Hopkins (Pacific School of Innovation and Inquiry)

Description: In this session, you will learn about the transformation happening in the K12 system and the impact it will bring to higher education and into your classroom. We will briefly review the history of the education system as we know it, what has shaped educational transformation in BC, and the shift away from lesson plans toward including learning plans co-constructed with the learner. Initial reactions include concern over how to support so many diverse pathways, so specific strategies will be included, down to sharing examples of specific tools used to communicate learning plans and document goals/progress, and methods for visibly documenting outputs. We will also discuss research on validity and reliability with regards to assessment, which may bring forward some debate about grading practices. What does one do with this information? Let’s talk about teaching!

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (3:15 PM - 4:30 PM)

F1: The truth about acting, and acting the truth: Skill-based learning
2018 2018K F1

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 110)

Facilitator(s): Clayton Jevne (Theatre)

Description: It is essential that instructors teaching courses involving learning a practical skill have a clear understanding of the conditions that need to be in place for optimal skill acquisition. Research into skill development defines what must be present in the training environment to ensure the effective teaching of a skill. This 90-minute Concurrent Session will identify these conditions and demonstrate why they are essential. Actor-training is the immediate focus of this presentation, but the fundamentals of ensuring a productive training environment are applicable across disciplines. In the case of actor-training, western (European and North American) approaches are based upon a premise can be demonstrated as false. As such, the conditions necessary for practical skill development cannot be accommodated in current actor-training programs. This session will explain why these conditions are absent in actor-training, and demonstrate how this absence both: deprives the student from learning acting as a skill; and poses a threat to the teacher’s empathic capacity. The participants in this session will have an opportunity to engage in actor-training exercises designed to acquaint them with the necessary conditions for skill development.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (3:15 PM - 4:30 PM)

F2: Empowering the UVic community to use technology to teach and learn
2018 2018K F2

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 116)

Facilitator(s): Aishah Bakhtiar, Becca Edwards (Technology Integrated Learning (LTSI)), Allyson Hadwin (Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies), Todd Milford (Curriculum & Instruction), Yushu Huang (Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies), Priyanka Sharma, Elizabeth Webster (Educational Psychology & Leadership Studies), Sarah Davis

Description: Join us in a structured poster session to share and discuss key findings from our research with undergraduate students at the University of Victoria. The session will follow this format: - 15 minute introduction to the session and to each of the posters - 40 minutes for participants to circulate to the posters to discuss findings and issues - 20 minute large group session focused on instructional implications and strategies. Please read the LTAT program for a description of the posters.

Thursday, August 30, 2018 (3:15 PM - 4:30 PM)

F3: Faculty Institute of Teaching (FIT): Instructors share what they found valuable in the learning and teaching program
2018 2018K F3

Location: Harry Hickman Building (Room: 128)

Facilitator(s): Sara Humphreys (English), Ilamparithi Thirumarai Chelvan (Electrical & Computer Engineering), Marty Wall (Division of Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation), Nadia Kulikova (Educational Psychology and Leadership), Joe Parsons (Learning and Teaching Support and Innovation), Christopher Eagle (Math & Stats)

Description: The Faculty Institute of Teaching (FIT), offered by the LTSI, provides the opportunity for faculty to enhance their skills in lecturing, teaching and learning strategies, syllabus construction, grading student performance, and teaching dossier preparation. The intent is to make a real difference in how faculty approach teaching, to save time in teaching preparations, to achieve learning outcomes, and above all to put faculty in a position to assume their UVic teaching responsibilities with increased competence and confidence. Recent graduates of the FIT program will share the valuable lessons they learned and how their courses have transformed due to taking FIT. More information here: https://ners.uvcs.uvic.ca/ltc/ners/Workshops/08/2018